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DIMENSIONAL WORKS »
Folding, Inserting, etc.  

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SURFACE TREATMENTS » Discharging, Rusting, etc.  
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Thread Painting, Sketching, etc.  

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REALISTIC & ABSTRACT »
Landscape, Portrature, etc.  

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APPLIQUE WORKS »
Needle-turned & Raw-edged, etc.  

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3D WORKS »
Fabric Boxes, Bowls, etc.  

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UTILITARIAN »
The Home, Wearables, etc.  

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BIOGRAPHY & EVENTS »
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dimensional

     Three Dimensional or 3D, refers to objects that have multiple surfaces and can be shaped any way from round to angular. They may jut out from a flat surface or stand alone like a large statue or an object you can hold in your hand. Almost anything can be incorporated in some way into a 3D piece. There are few rules, no size limits and therefore the artist is free to do almost anything. In Fiber Art, there are many materials to work with from string, twine, yarns, roving, rope and fabric. The materials can be woven, knit, knotted, twisted, corded, coiled, stitched, glued, tacked, stapled, folded, stretched, draped, pinned and stuffed either alone or in combination with other materials to fashion a multitude of shapes.

     Because fiber can be soft or stiff, it is possible to make it bend without breaking or become a sturdy component to an artwork. 3D fiber creations have a history in the practical and utilitarian, such as handbags, baskets, hats and of course clothing (wearables). I experimented with making a box out of fabric for my mother a few years ago. I looked around and found mostly tissue boxes covered in fabric. I wanted to make something more creative and found that a small box did not need much support if it were made of at least 3 layers (the middle being a stabilizer) and the layers were reinforced with stitching. From that initial experiment, I developed a few patterns for Folded Fabric Boxes which I call BelleBoites. I have also created smaller, simpler folded boxes that I call BabyBoites.


     Fabric Bowls and Trivets: I have also experimented with coiled fabric bowls and Trivets. Cotton laundry twine is wrapped with narrow strips of fabric, folded or torn, and the coils are stitched together with a zig-zag stitch. The process is very simple but time-consuming. The resulting pieces are thick, sturdy and functional. They can be rustic or very formal depending on the choice of fabric and used to hold fruit or act as a placemat or hot pad. It is possible to make two deeply curved bowls and sew them together to make a larger vase shape. I have yet to try this technique.

     Folded Fabric Boxes: "BelleBoites" (pronounced "bell bwat" -French for Beautiful Boxes) are my own original designs and can be made of any fabric that strikes one's fancy. I often created my own fabric such as a small, pieced, traditional quilt block or appliquéd design or used scraps of fabrics placed in a pleasing arrangement and heavily stitched (making sure all raw edges are safely tacked down). Once the box is folded and sm secured glass beads are selected (sometimes a lengthy process to get just the right ones) and attached to the lid.

      "BabyBoites" (Baby Boxes) are my small, approx. 2" square, folded, fabric boxes. Also an original design, they are made from a single, folded, 3-layer form (an outer fabric, stabilizer and lining fabric) and fastened together with Jeweler's wire. Many of them have free-motion stitching and other surface embellishments. (see Glossary for expanded technical details)

Click images or Scroll to view Samples below »             (see Contact page for info on purchasing artwork)


one

"BelleBoite" #1

Cotton, Metallic thread, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged appliqué, free-motion stitching, Hand-stitching with metallic thread

"BelleBoite #1 is the original folded fabric box made for my mother. It took several attempts until I settled on this design.
I free-motion stitched the raw-edged fabric scraps and highlighted the edges with silver, metallic thread hand-stitching."

 

 

 

 

 

 

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boxes

"BelleBoite"  Green Confetti
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged Applique, Free-motion machine stitching 

 

 

 

 

 

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box

"'BelleBoite"  Purple Pop
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Printed fabric, Fabric embellishment, Beaded Embellishment

"The highlight here is the little beaded, fabric blossom."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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box

 "BelleBoite"   CrissCross
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Fabric weaving, Beaded embellishment

"The torn fabric strips were woven together and stitched down."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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box

"BelleBoite"   Black Tie
Cotton, Glass Beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged Applique, Free-motion machine stitching  (Privately owned)

 

 

 

 

 


 

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"BelleBoite" Eggplant Zebra
Cotton, Glass Beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged Applique, Free-motion machine stitching 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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box

"BelleBoite" Headdress
Cotton Fabric, Glass Beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Fabric piecing

"I found some very eye-catching Tribal fabric and picked out some interesting sections, cut them out and
pieced them together with black fabric so the figures were placed strategically on the box's top and sides." 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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dragon

"BelleBoite" Dragon
Cotton Fabric, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire

"I had been given a few scraps of this wonderful Asian-themed fabric and decided it was perfect for a box. I featured
the Dragon's head on the lid of the box stuffing it with a bit of filler and added great beaded eyes for dramatic effect."
(Privately owned)

 

 

 

 

 

 



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"BelleBoite" HopScotch
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged Applique, Free-motion machine stitching 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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"BelleBoite" Lavender and Lime
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged Applique, Free-motion machine stitching 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"BelleBoite" Snail's Trail
Cotton, Gold Lame, Glass Beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Traditional fabric piecing

"I've always liked the Snail's Trail traditional quilt block design
and had one leftover from another project. It was just perfect for the lid."


 

 

 

 

 

 

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"BelleBoite" Persian Flowers
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire

"Much to my surprise when I finished this box I saw the fabric pattern lined up
almost perfectly all around. I had not planned it but was very pleased it turned out that way."  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"BelleBoite" Purple Confetti

Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire
Techniques: Raw-edged Applique, Free-motion machine stitching  (Privately owned)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"BelleBoite" Luxor
Cotton, Glass beads, Jeweler's wire

"I couldn't resist this luxurious fabric and therefore called the box Luxor".  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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babies

"BabyBoites"
Cotton, Beaded Embellishment, Jewler's wire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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trivits & bowls

Trivits & Fabric Bowl
Cotton, Cotton Laundry twine, Thread


 

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